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Downsizing is a Good Idea as Homeowners Age

You purchased a large property to fulfill the requirements of your family with kids. Now your kids are gone and settled in their own homes and careers. You are living with your spouse in the same large house, somehow coping with the maintenance costs and huge utility bills. Why don’t you move into a smaller apartment or house to cut down on your expenses and maintenance costs? Referred to as downsizing, this concept has become very popular among old age couples preparing for their retired life without kids and their families.

Cut down on your expenses

Are you frustrated by the fact that you have to mow the lawn on your own in an attempt to save on the fee charged by a gardener? Do you find it irritating to pay for the cost of heating and cooling such a large area inside the house when you and your spouse are effectively using only a small percent of the area?

Well, this is the case with most couples staring at their impending retirement with their children having moved to faraway places, settled in their careers. You can get rid of these extra expenses by simply selling your large house and moving into a smaller house or apartment. You can even start to live in a rented place, depositing all the cash you get by selling the house into your bank account.

There are emotional costs of downsizing

Cost of ownership is not limited to just financial costs. There are so many memories attached to the place you called your home for so many years. You have the neighbors and your friends living in the area. It can be painful leaving all these memories behind. Also, you need to find your new home in a place that is not too far away from the kids and your friends otherwise traveling back and forth could add to your expenses.

Calculate the cost of selling and buying

Selling your large house will no doubt fetch a lot of money in your hands but do not forget the commission of your agent and other related costs of selling. Add to this the cost of buying your new small home and take a decision to downsize only when you are able to save a considerable amount of money for your retired life. Downsizing proves counterproductive if you cannot give up on your ego and plan to splurge on furniture and other household items like before.

Learn more about C21 Lady of the Lakes Realtors and the numerous services they offer including: buying a new home, selling a home, or renting a home at www.ladyofthelakes.com.  To contact one of our real estate agents call 734-426-6060 today.

 

Hardball Fouls: 6 Home-Selling Negotiation Strategies That Can Backfire

When you’re selling your home, you might imagine you hold all the cards. And you do—sort of. But it’s easy to become overconfident in a seller’s market. If  you don’t do a reality check, pronto, you could end up sabotaging your sale. So much for that straight flush!

Here are six common home seller negotiation tactics that can totally backfire if you don’t approach them carefully.

1. Starting a bidding war

Bidding wars are the stuff of home sellers’ dreams. And there’s nothing wrong with fueling a little competition among buyers in order to get the best deal for you. But this tactic can easily backfire if you bungle it.

“If mishandled, people may assume the worst, and the best offer may walk away,” says Sep Niakan, owner/broker at Miami-based HB Roswell Realty.

Common bidding war bungles include the following:

  • Not clearly explaining upfront how you intend to handle multiple offers.
  • Giving an offer deadline that is too many days away. Some buyers might not want to wait for you to make a decision, especially if other homes are in contention.
  • Already having a strong offer on the table, but then insisting that all potential buyers come back with their highest and best bid. There’s no guarantee buyers will play ball and, if that strong offer walks, you’re stuck with lower offers to choose from.

Bottom line: Proceed with caution before turning up the heat on the competition, lest you risk losing out on a dream deal.

2. Haggling over repairs

What if the buyer completes an inspection and comes back with a long list of requested repairs? If sellers get too tough here, they might send a buyer walking.

The sellers should consider how good the overall package is for them before refusing to do repairs, says Lucas Machado, president of House Heroes in Miami. “When the buyer’s offer is high, and the seller tries to negotiate away from legitimate repairs, the buyer may feel the seller is taking advantage of them.”

3. Threatening to put your home back on the market

If negotiations aren’t quite going your way, you might be tempted to call the buyer’s bluff. Hey, if they don’t want to ante up, you can always put your home back on the market and find another eager buyer to squeeze. Right?

Yes, you might find another taker quickly. But beware of this move—it might not go according to plan.

That’s because there’s often a stigma associated with putting a home back on the market, and it might be harder to get buyers to take a second look, says Realtor® Michael Hottman, associate broker at Keller Williams Richmond West in Richmond, VA.

“Exercise caution with this tactic, because real estate markets can change quickly from hot to cold, leaving you without all those buyers you were expecting,” Hottman says. “And the ones who you had initially thought were legitimate prospects may have moved on to other homes in the time between your property originally going under contract and now coming back on the market.”

4. Being stubborn on the closing date

You’ve decided you’re not going to allow the new people to move in until (insert future date) because that’s when the closing date is on your new home. Or, they can’t possibly take possession this spring because your kids are still finishing school.

Guess what? Your buyers have scheduling issues of their own, says John Powell, chief development officer at Help-U-Sell Real Estate in Tucson, AZ.

“Sellers need to understand that they may have to move twice, since buyer and seller schedules seldom work out perfectly.”

5. Getting greedy over what comes with the house

Planning to take your beautiful custom light fixtures with you? Not so fast, Hottman warns. Often, he finds that sellers have expensive fixtures in place to show the home, but plan on taking them when they move. And that can cause trouble at the negotiating table.

The buyer “might have decided to buy the ceiling fan, and the house happens to come with it, or they get so upset that a fixture they fell in love with is now missing that they won’t buy the home,” Hottman says.

Avoid this confusion by replacing anything that won’t be staying with the house before you show it. If that’s not possible, be prepared to leave the prized fixture behind, or negotiate a comparable replacement.

6. Refusing to pay closing costs

So, you’re coming down the home stretch and this deal is almost done. Congratulations! But the buyer asked you to cover their closing costs.

Before you say “no way,” consider it this way: Buyers sometimes roll the amount of those closing costs into their offer. For instance, let’s say your home is listed for $200,000. A buyer might then submit an offer for $204,000, but ask you to cover the $4,000 in closing costs.

“Some sellers will hold firm at the $204,000 offer and refuse to pay the closing costs because they want this higher price the buyer offered,” Hottman says. “Some sellers can’t see the net is nearly identical between a $200,000 offer with no closing costs and $204,000 with $4,000 in seller-paid closing costs, and they miss out.”

A good deal comes down to doing the math, keeping your ego in check, and putting yourself in the buyer’s shoes. After all, when you sell your house, you’ll probably be buying one, too.

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/advice/sell/selling-negotiation-tactics-that-backfire/

Original Date: Nov 1 2017

Original Author:

The Smart Way to Buy a Home

Buying a house is perhaps the biggest financial decision of your life. You must remain careful and take a wise and informed decision as it is a matter of crucial importance for you.

Why are you buying the property?

There can be many reasons why you have decided to buy a property.

  • You are fed up of living in a rented property
  • You want to pay the EMI of your own home rather than feeding your landlord
  • Your family has outgrown the space available in your present home
  • You are interested in buying a rental property
  • You want a property having a yard
  • You desire to live closer to your workplace

Once you know the real reason behind your desire to buy a property, it becomes much easier to identify and buy the right property matching your requirements.

Can you afford buying a property?

Knowing the answer to this question is very important in arriving at a decision to buy a property. Of course it is a great way of building an asset for your family and an investment into your future. But only you know whether you can easily afford the monthly repayments to the lender for a long time to come. If you are settled in your career and sure of receiving increments in future, you can go ahead and buy a home for your family.

Preparations before buying

You may be surprised to know this but it is a fact that there are some preparations that are necessary to be carried out before you start the process of buying.

Make the green file

If you do not know, green file is a file that contains financial documents of an individual necessary for securing a loan. It includes:

  • Your banking details
  • Financial statements
  • Investments and assets
  • Credit card details
  • Loan details
  • Recent paystubs
  • Tax retunes
  • Life insurance policies
  • Retirement account information

Check your credit report

This is perhaps the most important step in your preparation for buying a property. Every lender studies your credit report and pays attention to your credit score before deciding in favor, or against giving you mortgage loan. Ask your credit report from one of the three credit ratings (Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union) and check your score before you go and apply for a mortgage loan in a bank. It is your credit score that decides how much of a loan the lender will give and at what rate of interest.

Be realistic with your expectations

Many individuals are very happy and excited when starting their search for a new home. All their enthusiasm fizzles out when they find that they are not getting their dream home in the price range that they have in their mind. If you have seen 3-4 houses and feel that you are not getting what you have in your mind, you have to remain prepared to make some compromises. This is exactly how people are able to buy homes for their families. A little compromise on space, location, price, and features is what you should be mentally prepared for. If you are too picky, you will spend a lot of time seeing houses and still not be satisfied with any of them.

Learn more about C21 Lady of the Lakes Realtors and the numerous services they offer including: buying a new home, selling a home, or renting a home at www.ladyofthelakes.com.  To contact one of our real estate agents call 734-426-6060 today.

5 Things that Every First Time Home Buyer Must Know

Congrats to you if you have made the decision to buy a home for your family. You will be fulfilling the great American dream and also creating an asset for yourself. Buying a home involves major financial transaction. You do not buy homes every now and then. Any mistake or negligence on your part can not only cost you dearly but also make the procedure tiring and tough for you.

Here are 5 things that you must absolutely know about before buying your first home:

  1. Know how much of a home you can afford

Many individuals become excited after landing a decent job. They are in such a hurry that they start conducting search for a home without knowing how much loan they can get from a bank based upon their financial statements. You are only wasting your and your realtor’s time if you do not know how big a home you can afford to buy.

  1. Location is crucial

Every first time home buyer needs to make an assessment of his requirements. This allows him to shortlist neighborhoods on the basis of amenities available, ease of transport, lifestyle, and the requirements of the family. It is no use starting on your search with your realtor without knowing what you want in terms of location of the house.

  1. Keep in mind your budget

You have saved a small amount of money to be given as down payment to the bank. You can easily calculate the price range in which you can buy a home for your family on the basis of this amount. Do not forget to keep aside money to meet the closing costs as well as the fees of your agent. It becomes easier to see houses that fall within your desired price range and politely refuse the request of your agent to see more expensive homes. Ask yourself if you can bite more than you can chew and you will stay on track when searching home for your family.

  1. Are you ready to pay the EMI’s?

Just because you have some money in your saving account does not mean you will be able to easily afford the monthly repayments to your lender. See what the monthly amount that you can pay comfortably is. Do not commit to until you feel you are ready for this kind of a commitment. Buying a home is easier than repaying monthly installment for a long time period of 20-25 years. Understand the terms and conditions of the mortgage clearly before signing the contract.

  1. Pump in as much down payment as you can afford

Your Down Payment Matters

Money spent on down payment should be considered as a wise investment and not as an unnecessary expenditure. You should offer to pay as high a down payment you can possibly afford to get a lower rate of interest and the confidence of the lender. Some individuals make the mistake of holding on to their savings when they get the facility of a no down payment mortgage loan. If you do not have a solid plan of investment, it is better to pay a large sum of money upfront to your lender.

Final Thought On Buying a Home

Buying a home is a huge transaction in your life. It should be based upon research and understanding of your own requirements and ability to repay the loan. Hiring the services of a reliable and experienced realtor can prove to be a very wise decision when buying a home.

Learn more about C21 Lady of the Lakes Realtors and the numerous services they offer including: buying a new home, selling a home, or renting a home at www.ladyofthelakes.com.  To contact one of our real estate agents call 734-426-6060 today.

7 Tips on How to Find a Good Real Estate Agent

Whether you’re buying or selling a house, understanding how to find a good real estate agent is essential. Your agent will help you through all steps of the process and answer the myriad technical, tactical, and financial questions that arise, so you don’t have to waste hours Googling into the abyss. A good real estate agent will also have a clear handle on the ins and outs of the housing market in your area. Below are some of the best places to turn to find someone you know you can trust.

1. Find the agent with the most listings

One simple, somewhat passive way to find the best real estate agent is to identify which agents have the most listings in your area. Experience with many clients indicates a certain amount of ambition and hustle. Be warned, however.

“If they have the bulk of the listing in your community, what priority do you think they will assign your home and yet another listing?” asks Jason Opland, a Realtor® with Better Homes and Gardens Realty in Columbus, OH.

2. Get referrals from family and friends

Another common strategy for finding an agent is through word of mouth. Ask your family, friends, and neighbors whom they recommend.

“If people close to you have used an agent they liked, then you’ll probably like them as well,” says agent Amy McDonald of Triplemint in New York City.

Be sure to explicitly ask “Would you use the person again?” says Denise Shur, a Realtor with 1:1 Realty in San Jose, CA. Shur also thinks hiring a friend or family member as an agent could work “if you reasonably believe they will look out for your interest like nobody else will.”

3. Get a referral from your previous agent

If you’re moving to a new area, you could reach out to your previous agent for a referral.

My brokerage “has a network of agents we use across the country, and we can refer you to someone who would likely be a good fit,” says McDonald.

4. Ask a relocation specialist

A cross-state or cross-country move can be daunting, especially if you’re unfamiliar with any real estate agents in the area.

“Your best option is to contact an agent who specializes in relocation and works with agents from across the country and has access to agent performance and production reports,” says Opland. He says a relocation specialist can collect information on the type of property you’re looking for and use that to match you with a top professional in your area.

5. Look for community leadership

Here’s an outside-the-box approach: Look beyond the performance numbers and find agents who have actually invested in the area.

“Work with someone who believes in your community and does more than sell homes—someone who participates in local schools, developing businesses, or charities,” says Realtor Rodney Camren of Keller Williams Realty Intown in Atlanta. “Someone who is really invested will sell more than your home—they’ll sell your entire community when the potential buyer presents themselves.”

6. Evaluate what ‘good’ means to you

Your idea of a good real estate agent is probably different from someone else’s, so it’s important to make a list of qualities you most desire in the person you hire to sell or find you a home.

“’Best’ is a very subjective term,” says Alex Cortez, a Realtor with Island Sotheby’s International Realty, in Makawao, HI.

Does “good” mean they’re the most ethical, have the highest sale volume, or have the greatest experience? Do you want an agent who takes charge, or one who focuses more on making you feel heard? Is customer service the highest priority?

“Keep in mind, you will be communicating with your agent for (potentially) several months as you search for a home, submit an offer, and go through the escrow process,” says Cortez. “It would be in your best interest to find an agent with whom you have a natural rapport.”

7. Make sure the agent’s license is up to date

Before you sign with an agent, there’s one more thing you should check: the agent’s license. To check that the license is current, go to your state’s real estate department website and look up the agent’s name. You will also be able to see if the agent has faced any disciplinary action.

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/advice/buy/how-do-i-find-the-three-best-realtors-in-my-area/

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Don’t Forget this House Hunting Checklist when You Buy a Home

Most buyers feel shy to enquire about small details when they go for a showing. They behave in a very formal manner and feel awkward to look under the sink or behind the closets when they are being shown around by the owner or the listing agent. But there is no need to think you are being nosy and snooping around. After all, you will be paying a huge amount of money to the owner if you decide to buy his property. Is it better to feel awkward later on when you find any problems with the house or feel awkward now? Real estate experts say it is better to reassure yourself now than repent later on. They suggest keeping a house hunting checklist with you when you are touring a property.

Explore the Bathroom When Previewing a Home

Every home buyer has a desire to get a glance of the bathroom. Owners proudly show their bathroom to the visitor but only for as long as they want, not any longer. If you are a smart buyer, make the most of this showing. Excuse yourself saying you need to use the bathroom for a minute. Now you are free to closely examine everything inside the bathroom from the toilet seat and the flush to the bathtub and the faucets. See if the water pressure is nice and the flush is working properly. Some owners consider it as impolite but include bathroom in your house hunting checklist.

Take a Closer Look into the Closets

Owners take potential buyers around their property and show them the closets that look newly painted with new handles. But they do not like it when a visitor tries to take a look inside these closets. Of course you need not go through his belongings but you are well within your rights when you want to ascertain the actual storage space inside the closets. Include spying inside the closets in your house hunting checklist as you are paying for these closets and you are entitled to find out if your storage needs are fulfilled by these closets or not.

Don’t Wait for the Inspection

It is not enough to take a glance inside the attic and the basement when the owner opens the doors to feel assured. A thorough investigation is what is needed to give a clean chit to these two features inside the house. If the excuse for not showing your around inside both the basement and the attic is the belongings of the owner piled against the walls, you can ask for their removal when you make a second visit to the house. In fact, it should raise suspicion in your mind why the homeowner has stockpiled items in the basement and the attic when he is planning to sell the house? There are reasons why you should feel nervous when you see a packed attic and basement in a house.

Learn more about C21 Lady of the Lakes Realtors and the numerous services they offer including: buying a new home, selling a home, or renting a home at www.ladyofthelakes.com.  To contact one of our real estate agents call 734-426-6060 today.

 

What to Expect From a Listing Agent

Before you start making lofty demands of your listing agent, it’s important to understand what the agent is actually responsible for. We’re not saying you’re high-maintenance; you just need to know what you can and can’t ask the agent to do.

By setting realistic expectations, you’re likely to leave the home-selling process feeling like your agent really did all she could to get you the best deal—even if you didn’t see or hear about every little thing she did to market your home. In the interest of transparency, let’s dive into the things a listing agent is responsible for once you sign a contract.

What role does a listing agent play?

A listing agent’s job is “to help direct the seller in preparing the house for sale, market the property to buyer’s agents, and handle the offer and transaction process to get the sale to completion,” says Teri Andrews Murch, a Realtor® with Lyon Real Estate in Auburn, CA.

So when you think about your expectations for your agent, make sure they fit within that scope.

However, the specific responsibilities can vary from agent to agent. A good listing agent will help you price your home, attend pitch sessions, recommend a photographer and stager to make your home look its best, and put your home on the multiple listing service.

Some agents might be unwilling to fulfill every one of your requests if they don’t think they will help your home sell. For example, you might want to advertise your house in the local paper, but “depending on the area you are in, print advertising may not be used much at all,” says Murch.

Set expectations from the start

To make sure you’re both on the same page, you should discuss your expectations from the get-go with any real estate agent you plan on hiring. Find out how often you’ll communicate, and by what means.

“Usually I try to touch base with my sellers when I have feedback from showings or agent tours, and at least once every seven to 10 days by phone,” Murch says.

“Don’t be afraid to be upfront and to the point with your real estate agent,” she adds. “We want to know when our clients aren’t happy.”

Once you’re in agreement, put it in writing in the form of a listing agreement.

“A listing agreement should be a partnership,” says real estate consultant Cathy Baumbusch of Alexandria, VA. “Both parties should outline their expectations in the beginning, in detail, and in writing. That is the only way you can do business.”

You won’t see all the agent’s work

Just because things seem quiet doesn’t mean the agent isn’t working on your behalf.

“A lot of the work we do—such as networking with other agents, maintaining the listing, answering calls or inquiries, and sending out information—tends to be invisible to the sellers unless we communicate that,” says Murch.

However, if more regular updates will make you happy, speak up.

When things go wrong

Sometimes, even after you’ve agreed on everything with your agent in writing, your expectations aren’t met. What then?

Before you send that angry email, be honest with yourself and see if you’re holding anything up.

“I would look at the home’s condition—how does it show?” says Murch. “Are there too many restrictions on how or when the property can be shown?”

If you truly believe that your home looks show-ready and that you’ve made it available, Murch says you might need to revisit the pricing. That could be why you haven’t attracted interest yet.

Other ways to troubleshoot your stalled sale?

“Ask your agent to provide you with the list of all marketing avenues, and then see how it looks in comparison with other properties that are active or sold in your area,” says Janice Caputo, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker in Pittsburgh.

Definitely have a conversation with your agent if you’re unsatisfied, and try to be receptive to the agent’s feedback. If you believe that your agent isn’t taking your concerns seriously, your next course of action is speaking with the agent’s agency.

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/advice/sell/what-should-i-expect-from-my-realtor/

Original Author:

Original Date: Oct 4 2017

‘It’s Been Months and My Home Won’t Sell’—How to Revive a Stale Listing

A house that’s seen minimal movement on the market for months is frustrating. In fact, frustrating might be an understatement. For some, a home that won’t sell can be a desperate situation—especially if selling it was a last-ditch effort to avoid foreclosure. That’s why, if you have yet to find a buyer, it’s important to take a step back and assess exactly why your house isn’t selling. So let’s dive in and discuss some of the main factors that hinder house sales and how you can maneuver your way around them so you can offload your home—hopefully sooner than later.

Ask your real estate agent these questions

If your house has been on the market for months with no offers, the first factor you want to consider is the market. Does the current market favor buyers or sellers? Talk to your real estate agent about the median days on the market in your area for comparable homes. Perhaps things just aren’t moving quickly in the current market. Sometimes, real estate is hot, and other times it’s not.

You can also discuss any showings by your agent or other agents and the feedback given by other agents and potential buyers. Their feedback could help you rethink how you and your agent are marketing the house.

Some other questions to ask your agent include:

  • Is your home listed on your local multiple listing service?
  • Has every inquiry turned into a showing appointment? If not, why?
  • How does your listing look compared with the homes priced similarly?
  • Since the day you listed, what properties have accepted offers, how many days did it take, and what price were they asking?

Reassess your expectations

While you might think your house is a steal of a deal, make sure you’re able to objectively look at the situation, says Beverley Hourlier, a Realtor® with Hilltop Chateau in San Diego.

“The buyer has to perceive the value to be there. If not, no offers. How do you stand up to the comparables in the neighborhood? Be honest in your assessment, because vanity or pride could be costing you money,” she says

Is the price right?

Beyond the temperature of the market and your marketing efforts, the most likely factor when it comes to a lack of offers on a home is price.

“Properties sell when they are priced correctly,” says Tracey Martin, a Realtor with Realty World Premier Associates in Salinas, CA. “The value of your home is determined by what a buyer is willing to pay for it. If it is too high, you won’t get any offers.”

Marketing makes a big difference, too, says Robin Lemmons, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker King in Gahanna, OH.

“If you have had a lot of showings with no offers, it is a pricing issue. If you are having very little activity, it can be a pricing or marketing issue. Is your house being marketed on all the major websites? How is the quality and quantity of the photos?” she says.

How low can you go?

If you determine your home was overpriced out of the gate, then lowering it might help. However, you need to be strategic in terms of just how much you drop the price. You can slash your price by $50,000, but if it’s still above your competition or there are major repairs or updates that need to be done, your chances of selling remain low.

Of course, you never want to lower the price below the amount owed on your loan. Instead of doing that, you should either stay in the property until the value goes up, consider a short sale, or pay the difference between what you owe and what you can get for your home.

Consider new representation

If your agent isn’t responsive or doesn’t have a good explanation for why your property isn’t selling, then you might want to consider a new agent, says Teresa Stephenson, vice president of residential brokerage for Platinum Properties in New York. Just don’t expect a new agent to have the magic solution.

“If you speak with another agent, keep in mind that they are motivated to tell you what you want to hear,” Stephenson says. “If they are telling you that they can get you the price you want, ask them for data to justify their claims. With the transparency and accessibility provided by the internet today, it is a rare circumstance when a real estate agent has exclusive access to any buyers. Buyers know what is out there,” she says.

While it might not always happen as quickly as you like, your home will eventually sell. You just need a strong strategy, a healthy dose of patience, and, let’s face it, a bit of good luck.

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/advice/sell/why-wont-my-house-sell-after-months-on-the-market/

Original Date: Sept 14 2017

Original Author: Julie Ryan Evans

Qualities of a Professional Realtor

Are you looking to buy or sell your home in the near future?  Having a realtor do this for you is the best option to consider.  Their entire job description revolves around buying, selling, and renting real estate property for clients.  Therefore having a professional conduct your real estate transactions will not place you in jeopardy in the long run.

Expectations of a Good Realtor

Professionalism

With the vast knowledge realtors have in real estate realtors can manage your plan for property sale or purchase. With the experience gained over time, they will adequately handle your contract due to familiarity with the real estate market. The realtor is also responsible for handling paperwork associated with the real estate property in question. The realtor helps his/her client from being deceived into acquiring property with fake documentation.

Negotiation skills

Realtors are responsible for crafting transactions for their clients with consideration to their budget and needs. With cases of extortion of customers buying overpriced property or sell their property at a lower value the realtor, on the other hand, helps in establishing a fair value for their client. Ensuring fairness by their unmatched negotiation skills they will give their client what they deserve.

Vast Backing

The variety of resources a realtor has to offer is so broad that clients will be more than satisfied with their service. The realtor will assist in getting in touch with a bank for a loan, home auditors, mortgage advisors and attorneys in case complications occur in a transaction. They will
also be in charge of finding real estate property best suited for a client by guiding you into what is best in the current market.

Commitment

Realtors take an oath to follow work ethics that enhance fairness, order, and honesty of both transacting parties before being handed their licenses. Therefore it distinguishes a realtor from an agent or broker. The realtor schedules appointments with your potential clients, research about the property verifying all legal requirements. With more than just follow up of your transaction, the commitment of a realtor is with no doubt reliable.

Though getting a realtor comes at a fee, going through the whole transaction alone might lead to various complications in the long run. Hiring a real estate expert with broad knowledge of the market is the best option if you are looking forward to buying or selling the property. Time and
work put in will also be saved.

Learn more about C21 Lady of the Lakes Realtors and the numerous services they offer including: buying a new home, selling a home, or renting a home at www.ladyofthelakes.com.  To contact one of our real estate agents call 734-426-6060 today.

What Are Real Estate Agents’ Hours Like?

When you have a home to sell or want to buy a home, you’re probably going to start wondering about real estate agents’ hours. If you’re like most of us and have an even mildly insane schedule—work, kids, you name it—meeting with anyone during normal business hours can be a serious challenge. So how hard is it to find someone who can work around your hours? And what type of hours does a real estate agent keep, anyhow?

Real estate agents’ hours vary

So what hours do they work? The simple answer: Everything depends on the agent. If you’ve looked for houses before, you know that most open houses happen on weekends around brunch time or into the early afternoon. That’s a time frame that most real estate agents expect to dedicate to their clients. Saturday at 8 p.m.? Not so likely.

Still, if your schedule allows you to view houses only on weeknight evenings, there is probably an agent out there who can accommodate you. You just have to look.

The 80-20 rule often applies when it comes to real estate agents, says Lee Dworshak, a real estate agent with Keller Williams LA Harbor Realty in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA.

“Twenty percent of the licensed agents out there are handling 80% of the sales,” she says.

What about the other 80%? They are agents most likely working part time, possibly around their kids’ schedules or a primary career. That means their hours are more limited, although they could coincide with the hours when you are available. Just ask.

Real estate agent Ashlie Roberson of Triplemint tells clients her office hours are from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

“That said, a great broker understands that this is an industry where we work around our client’s schedule, and we do what we need to do to provide the best service possible, regardless of what time it is,” Roberson says.

Communication is key

If you know your schedule is hectic, be sure to mention this to your agent before you start working together. Have a frank conversation about how well your times will sync up before you sign an agreement. This will ensure you’re not signing up for months of mutual frustration.

Roberson makes herself available for emergencies occurring beyond her office hours. But she says planning is crucial. So if you need to schedule an early-morning or late-night showing, be sure to bring it up well ahead of time. There’s no guarantee that your agent will be able to accommodate you, but providing notice makes it more likely.

The home you’re interested in buying might be occupied while it’s on the market, Roberson adds. “This just means there’s another party’s schedule you need to take into consideration. So there are a lot of factors that contribute to your schedule.”

To make the process work for everyone, you will need to be flexible, too. Keep in mind that this inconvenience is temporary. A little sacrifice of time now will pay off later. But the good news is, whatever your hours, there’s probably a Realtor who can work with you.

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/advice/sell/what-are-a-realtors-hours-like/

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Original Date: Sept 1 2017